Still Out and About - More Delays.
 
I can’t believe the many wonderful changes happening in my life at present, on more than one front, some personal (all good, though) - Above and beyond packing and moving, things are still tremendously busy, and I still need to leave my desk and go into town for a day occasionally (this time to look at a car), and there are a couple of long weekends upon us.
 
Right, you got it, that means more delays in blogging from me.
 
My apologies to all who liked the daily flow I had going there for a time (I did, too). Sometimes I just need to step back and take a breather. Please bear with me, I will be back.
 
Cheers, everyone!
 
Allyson

Still Out and About - More Delays.

 

I can’t believe the many wonderful changes happening in my life at present, on more than one front, some personal (all good, though) - Above and beyond packing and moving, things are still tremendously busy, and I still need to leave my desk and go into town for a day occasionally (this time to look at a car), and there are a couple of long weekends upon us.

 

Right, you got it, that means more delays in blogging from me.

 

My apologies to all who liked the daily flow I had going there for a time (I did, too). Sometimes I just need to step back and take a breather. Please bear with me, I will be back.

 

Cheers, everyone!

 

Allyson

Back on Track - Mostly.
 
It’s been an interesting couple of weeks - as a sci-fi writer more in sync with a solitary lifestyle and ensconced in a silent office at home in a rural setting, it came as rather an aural shock to spend several days in the full hustle and bustle of city life while we got our signatures witnessed and various official forms lodged in our quest for a new house.
 
Getting up early is not problem, we rise between 4:00 and 4:30 a.m. on weekdays simply because my husband prefers to be at work by 7:00 (so he can finish earlier to gain us some semblance of an evening together) and needs to travel two hours each way into the city and out again. So, we were out of the house by 5:00, dodging kangaroos in the predawn light and admiring mist in the valleys and various town lights as we drove through them. I don’t often get to see this, so all of it was wonderful, but at 7:00 a.m., I was released into an unfamiliar shopping mall to find my own way and to wait the day out (ten hours).
 
It was interesting and different, although I admit it grew into a field of noise and distraction. I hunted out quieter zones between coffee and pit stops as I bided my time without turning the whole into a shopping-fest. I’ll have you know, I did very well. I know it sounds like a Whoopie moment with much shopping and merriment, but it was not that sort of visit. I bought a bunch of crossword books (Killer Sudoku, Kakuro and Cryptic Crosswords) which kept me quiet and mostly out of harm’s way.
 
Before the string of city visits ended, though, the flu hit, which was not so pleasant and is the main reason for my exceedingly shoddy blogging of late.
 
That aside, the really Good News is that it’s all done. The loan has been approved, the paperwork is all in, we await now the settlement date and our gradual move can take place from where we are to where we’re going.
 
I can also tell you that I’ve sorted out my last few hurdles in my current plot (Book Three of the Khekarian series), which means I can advance on that front as well.
 
All round, things are looking very, very good! :D 
 
A special Thank You to all of you who wished me well, sent your prayers and encouraging messages. Your efforts have worked well and are much appreciated.
 
Cheers, everyone. :D 
 
Allyson

Back on Track - Mostly.

 

It’s been an interesting couple of weeks - as a sci-fi writer more in sync with a solitary lifestyle and ensconced in a silent office at home in a rural setting, it came as rather an aural shock to spend several days in the full hustle and bustle of city life while we got our signatures witnessed and various official forms lodged in our quest for a new house.

 

Getting up early is not problem, we rise between 4:00 and 4:30 a.m. on weekdays simply because my husband prefers to be at work by 7:00 (so he can finish earlier to gain us some semblance of an evening together) and needs to travel two hours each way into the city and out again. So, we were out of the house by 5:00, dodging kangaroos in the predawn light and admiring mist in the valleys and various town lights as we drove through them. I don’t often get to see this, so all of it was wonderful, but at 7:00 a.m., I was released into an unfamiliar shopping mall to find my own way and to wait the day out (ten hours).

 

It was interesting and different, although I admit it grew into a field of noise and distraction. I hunted out quieter zones between coffee and pit stops as I bided my time without turning the whole into a shopping-fest. I’ll have you know, I did very well. I know it sounds like a Whoopie moment with much shopping and merriment, but it was not that sort of visit. I bought a bunch of crossword books (Killer Sudoku, Kakuro and Cryptic Crosswords) which kept me quiet and mostly out of harm’s way.

 

Before the string of city visits ended, though, the flu hit, which was not so pleasant and is the main reason for my exceedingly shoddy blogging of late.

 

That aside, the really Good News is that it’s all done. The loan has been approved, the paperwork is all in, we await now the settlement date and our gradual move can take place from where we are to where we’re going.

 

I can also tell you that I’ve sorted out my last few hurdles in my current plot (Book Three of the Khekarian series), which means I can advance on that front as well.

 

All round, things are looking very, very good! :D

 

A special Thank You to all of you who wished me well, sent your prayers and encouraging messages. Your efforts have worked well and are much appreciated.

 

Cheers, everyone. :D

 

Allyson

If It’s Just A Cold, Why Does It Feel Like Bubonic Plague? 
 
What a time to fall ill! A lot of things are happening, there’s an interstate move coming up (any minute), which means packing and sorting, and then there’s the third book in my science fiction series still to finish.
 
I’m not a tablet-taker, outside of coffee and alcohol (only occasionally now), I don’t take drugs at all until I catch a cold or a flu and my nose is running and I can’t sleep for choking on the stuff going down the back of my neck. So I hit the cold and flu tablets and the side-effects give me extra symptoms, mainly sleepy and queasy, although the lack of energy is more likely to be the bug itself and not the medicine.
 
It doesn’t help that this is the time I have to go into the city and get papers signed and processed, which is all part of the move and likely to be where I got the bug from in the first place.
 
Today I’m home and will spend much of it in bed. I’m writing this to let you know I haven’t jumped out of Blogsville in any serious sense, I just haven’t been here and my head isn’t functioning properly.
 
I hope you guys are going great and are keeping warm and are writing well.
 
I will catch up with everyone to the best of my ability when I can.
 
Cheers, all.
 
Allyson

If It’s Just A Cold, Why Does It Feel Like Bubonic Plague?

 

What a time to fall ill! A lot of things are happening, there’s an interstate move coming up (any minute), which means packing and sorting, and then there’s the third book in my science fiction series still to finish.

 

I’m not a tablet-taker, outside of coffee and alcohol (only occasionally now), I don’t take drugs at all until I catch a cold or a flu and my nose is running and I can’t sleep for choking on the stuff going down the back of my neck. So I hit the cold and flu tablets and the side-effects give me extra symptoms, mainly sleepy and queasy, although the lack of energy is more likely to be the bug itself and not the medicine.

 

It doesn’t help that this is the time I have to go into the city and get papers signed and processed, which is all part of the move and likely to be where I got the bug from in the first place.

 

Today I’m home and will spend much of it in bed. I’m writing this to let you know I haven’t jumped out of Blogsville in any serious sense, I just haven’t been here and my head isn’t functioning properly.

 

I hope you guys are going great and are keeping warm and are writing well.

 

I will catch up with everyone to the best of my ability when I can.

 

Cheers, all.

 

Allyson

To Boldly Go Where No Backhoe Has Gone Before - Well, on our block, anyway.

 

Where was I? Oh, yes, out on the 250 acres of wilderness block in the Northern Territory, aiming between two trees in a backhoe I’d only taught myself to drive that morning, putting a road in down to the flatland below the steep hill.

 

Fortunately a backhoe is a fairly slow-going machine, although it does speed up on a steep incline, and this was steep. The bucket down and scraping along the surface acted as a brake and I was able to keep between the trees. It was a job that needed repeating several times to scrape down to clear earth, but that first time through the maze and all the way down the hill to level ground felt good. I hadn’t taken out a single tree (I like trees and our intention with the block was to enjoy the wilderness).

 

Turning around, of course, meant I had to come back up again. That was actually scarier. I kept everything low because the feeling was, if the bucket had been up, the whole lot might have tumbled over backwards.

 

That night, Greg returned home to find the backhoe missing. Fortunately, I wasn’t missing with it, and I could show him what I had done with the road down the hill - and point out the backhoe on the way. :D 

 

As it was after dark when Greg got home, we drove the length of my road by car with the headlights on. Greg was quite impressed. The road stretched almost one km (about half a mile). Returning up the hill to our campsite, Greg noticed the same issue I had with the steepness of the hill. Knowing I had run up and down several times, he asked the obvious question.

 

“How did you get the backhoe up each time? Did you drive it up backwards?”

 

“No,” I replied.

 

“Bloody hell,” he replied, “I would have.”

 

So, where was the backhoe?

 

It was down by the first creek. Getting adventurous and wanting to extend the road further, I’d driven it into a field of mud and bogged it - Four times! How I got it out each time by myself, until nightfall forced me to quit on the final one, is the topic of my next post on our wilderness Living.

 

Quite a full first day driving the backhoe and it was fun!

 

How does any of this fit in with writing? This is the block where I lived off-grid and without a house for nearly five years, where I wrote in perfect isolation, and where my sci-fi Khekarian series came into being - complete with wilderness planets born from love of wilderness living.

 

Cheers all! :D

 

Allyson
Zoom Info
To Boldly Go Where No Backhoe Has Gone Before - Well, on our block, anyway.

 

Where was I? Oh, yes, out on the 250 acres of wilderness block in the Northern Territory, aiming between two trees in a backhoe I’d only taught myself to drive that morning, putting a road in down to the flatland below the steep hill.

 

Fortunately a backhoe is a fairly slow-going machine, although it does speed up on a steep incline, and this was steep. The bucket down and scraping along the surface acted as a brake and I was able to keep between the trees. It was a job that needed repeating several times to scrape down to clear earth, but that first time through the maze and all the way down the hill to level ground felt good. I hadn’t taken out a single tree (I like trees and our intention with the block was to enjoy the wilderness).

 

Turning around, of course, meant I had to come back up again. That was actually scarier. I kept everything low because the feeling was, if the bucket had been up, the whole lot might have tumbled over backwards.

 

That night, Greg returned home to find the backhoe missing. Fortunately, I wasn’t missing with it, and I could show him what I had done with the road down the hill - and point out the backhoe on the way. :D 

 

As it was after dark when Greg got home, we drove the length of my road by car with the headlights on. Greg was quite impressed. The road stretched almost one km (about half a mile). Returning up the hill to our campsite, Greg noticed the same issue I had with the steepness of the hill. Knowing I had run up and down several times, he asked the obvious question.

 

“How did you get the backhoe up each time? Did you drive it up backwards?”

 

“No,” I replied.

 

“Bloody hell,” he replied, “I would have.”

 

So, where was the backhoe?

 

It was down by the first creek. Getting adventurous and wanting to extend the road further, I’d driven it into a field of mud and bogged it - Four times! How I got it out each time by myself, until nightfall forced me to quit on the final one, is the topic of my next post on our wilderness Living.

 

Quite a full first day driving the backhoe and it was fun!

 

How does any of this fit in with writing? This is the block where I lived off-grid and without a house for nearly five years, where I wrote in perfect isolation, and where my sci-fi Khekarian series came into being - complete with wilderness planets born from love of wilderness living.

 

Cheers all! :D

 

Allyson
Zoom Info

To Boldly Go Where No Backhoe Has Gone Before - Well, on our block, anyway.

 

Where was I? Oh, yes, out on the 250 acres of wilderness block in the Northern Territory, aiming between two trees in a backhoe I’d only taught myself to drive that morning, putting a road in down to the flatland below the steep hill.

 

Fortunately a backhoe is a fairly slow-going machine, although it does speed up on a steep incline, and this was steep. The bucket down and scraping along the surface acted as a brake and I was able to keep between the trees. It was a job that needed repeating several times to scrape down to clear earth, but that first time through the maze and all the way down the hill to level ground felt good. I hadn’t taken out a single tree (I like trees and our intention with the block was to enjoy the wilderness).

 

Turning around, of course, meant I had to come back up again. That was actually scarier. I kept everything low because the feeling was, if the bucket had been up, the whole lot might have tumbled over backwards.

 

That night, Greg returned home to find the backhoe missing. Fortunately, I wasn’t missing with it, and I could show him what I had done with the road down the hill - and point out the backhoe on the way. :D

 

As it was after dark when Greg got home, we drove the length of my road by car with the headlights on. Greg was quite impressed. The road stretched almost one km (about half a mile). Returning up the hill to our campsite, Greg noticed the same issue I had with the steepness of the hill. Knowing I had run up and down several times, he asked the obvious question.

 

“How did you get the backhoe up each time? Did you drive it up backwards?”

 

“No,” I replied.

 

“Bloody hell,” he replied, “I would have.”

 

So, where was the backhoe?

 

It was down by the first creek. Getting adventurous and wanting to extend the road further, I’d driven it into a field of mud and bogged it - Four times! How I got it out each time by myself, until nightfall forced me to quit on the final one, is the topic of my next post on our wilderness Living.

 

Quite a full first day driving the backhoe and it was fun!

 

How does any of this fit in with writing? This is the block where I lived off-grid and without a house for nearly five years, where I wrote in perfect isolation, and where my sci-fi Khekarian series came into being - complete with wilderness planets born from love of wilderness living.

 

Cheers all! :D

 

Allyson

A Snap Decision And A Leap! Our House in the Mountains!
 
It has all come together beautifully - and we’ve landed something special, a house at the Southern tip of the mountain range that runs down through New South Wales and into Victoria, incorporating the Snowy Mountains, Kosciuszko National Park (Mount Kosciuszko is Australia’s tallest mountain) and Alpine National Park and others, with many mountains along the way.
 
On the NSW side, Mount Perisher’s Ski Resort reports that the 2014 snow season has seen some of the biggest snowfalls in decades with over two metres of snow falling in a two week period and has extended it’s skiing season all the way to Oct 10 (Australia is officially in Spring now). We’re moving beyond Perisher, further south (away from the sun) and into the next state, Victoria, so let’s hope it’s not snowing during any part of our move!
 
The house itself is three bedrooms in glorious isolation, with a romantic open fireplace and a combustion stove in another room which will probably be my choice of office. I’m not sure, as yet. Why am I not sure? Because, although we intended to, we haven’t actually seen the house. It was a snap decision and a leap, and that makes it even more exciting. :D
 
From where we are now, the trip one way will take about ten hours, depending which road we take - the shortest route uses a dirt road requiring a 4 wheel drive, so not likely the one we’ll take any delicate goods and chattels over. Our first drive down with non-important stuff will sort out the way. Yes, we’re doing the move ourselves, probably in eight or so runs.
 
I don’t particularly enjoy packing because decisions have to be made about what to keep and what to let go. I do love unpacking in a new environment, though, and planning what goes where. :D 
 
So, the adventure is on. Things will be up in the air, blogging-wise, and there will be a gap when I land there. Currently the house has no phone at all, so that needs to be sorted to give a modem link to the Internet until we can sort out a satellite dish.
 
Meanwhile, I WILL be getting a LOT of writing done and finish Book Three. There have been many delays with this one and I am eager to see it done.
 
Cheers everyone! :D
 
Allyson

A Snap Decision And A Leap! Our House in the Mountains!

 

It has all come together beautifully - and we’ve landed something special, a house at the Southern tip of the mountain range that runs down through New South Wales and into Victoria, incorporating the Snowy Mountains, Kosciuszko National Park (Mount Kosciuszko is Australia’s tallest mountain) and Alpine National Park and others, with many mountains along the way.

 

On the NSW side, Mount Perisher’s Ski Resort reports that the 2014 snow season has seen some of the biggest snowfalls in decades with over two metres of snow falling in a two week period and has extended it’s skiing season all the way to Oct 10 (Australia is officially in Spring now). We’re moving beyond Perisher, further south (away from the sun) and into the next state, Victoria, so let’s hope it’s not snowing during any part of our move!

 

The house itself is three bedrooms in glorious isolation, with a romantic open fireplace and a combustion stove in another room which will probably be my choice of office. I’m not sure, as yet. Why am I not sure? Because, although we intended to, we haven’t actually seen the house. It was a snap decision and a leap, and that makes it even more exciting. :D

 

From where we are now, the trip one way will take about ten hours, depending which road we take - the shortest route uses a dirt road requiring a 4 wheel drive, so not likely the one we’ll take any delicate goods and chattels over. Our first drive down with non-important stuff will sort out the way. Yes, we’re doing the move ourselves, probably in eight or so runs.

 

I don’t particularly enjoy packing because decisions have to be made about what to keep and what to let go. I do love unpacking in a new environment, though, and planning what goes where. :D

 

So, the adventure is on. Things will be up in the air, blogging-wise, and there will be a gap when I land there. Currently the house has no phone at all, so that needs to be sorted to give a modem link to the Internet until we can sort out a satellite dish.

 

Meanwhile, I WILL be getting a LOT of writing done and finish Book Three. There have been many delays with this one and I am eager to see it done.

 

Cheers everyone! :D

 

Allyson

THE KNIFE! From The Khekarian Threat, out now on Amazon.
 
Sturn grabbed at her shirt as he reached her, ripping it open with his left hand, his right swinging into action with the knife even as Aleisha gave a squeal of terror.
 
*
 
Sturn getting physical. Excerpt from The Khekarian Threat, Book One in the Khekarian series.
 
First 4 chapters FREE for You to read at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

THE KNIFE! From The Khekarian Threat, out now on Amazon.

 

Sturn grabbed at her shirt as he reached her, ripping it open with his left hand, his right swinging into action with the knife even as Aleisha gave a squeal of terror.

 

*

 

Sturn getting physical. Excerpt from The Khekarian Threat, Book One in the Khekarian series.

 

First 4 chapters FREE for You to read at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

Moving House… Maybe.
 
We may have a move on the way - I wasn’t going to mention it until we were sure, but our preparations are impinging on my blogging activity, which is why my posts have suddenly dropped away.
 
I will do my best to post at least once a day and will certainly continue my ‘Wilderness Adventures’, but there will be times (as you may already have noticed) that I don’t make it in at all.
 
We are still waiting for final confirmation and once we get that, I can tell you more about where we are going to and what’s happening.
 
*
 
Thank you, all, for your patience. Yes, I can assure you, I am still getting some writing-writing done (on The Bastard Line, book three of the Khekarian series). It’s just that life generally has suddenly grown very busy.
 
Cheers, everyone! :D
 
Allyson

Moving House… Maybe.

 

We may have a move on the way - I wasn’t going to mention it until we were sure, but our preparations are impinging on my blogging activity, which is why my posts have suddenly dropped away.

 

I will do my best to post at least once a day and will certainly continue my ‘Wilderness Adventures’, but there will be times (as you may already have noticed) that I don’t make it in at all.

 

We are still waiting for final confirmation and once we get that, I can tell you more about where we are going to and what’s happening.

 

*

 

Thank you, all, for your patience. Yes, I can assure you, I am still getting some writing-writing done (on The Bastard Line, book three of the Khekarian series). It’s just that life generally has suddenly grown very busy.

 

Cheers, everyone! :D

 

Allyson

Backhoe Lesson 101 - Just Do It.
 
Out there in the wilderness on my very first day alone, I had envisioned a day of writing, only there was a backhoe to master, a hill to work out and a road to put in - I thought I had better start early.
 
With the driveway Greg had already put in at my back, I had three options off the hill. Right, left or straight ahead. On closer inspection, it became clear that I only really had one option. The right side of the hill dipped away far too steeply to consider, dropping into a gully that a person might climb but not walk. To the left was a little better, except for when the rocks formed a cliff drop closer to the bottom. So, straight ahead it was, steep as it was, or give up entirely and find another way into the block.
 
I wanted to keep the trees, also, so needed to find a suitable way through them that wouldn’t take me over the edge of something and leave in a crumpled wreckage at the bottom of the hill. It was morning still and the sun was barely up. Greg wouldn’t be home again until after dark, and I didn’t want to spend the day trapped in wreckage.
 
First off, though, I had to learn those controls. What did what? For starters, the pedal was a three-pronged monstrosity - each prong doing something different as it titled the main pedal in a different direction, and of course it had different levers, which raised and extended the arm into different configurations, raised and tilted the bucket at the front or the scoop at the back, and lowered or raised the feet that helped steady the machine through certain operations. All of these jolted the machine alarmingly if employed too roughly. It needed a gentle touch.
 
With that sorted and a plan of action in mind, I lowered the bucket, aimed between two trees and started off over the brow of the hill.
 
*
 
My adventures living in the wilderness without a house or amenities, where the sci-fi Khekarian series was born and gave me a love of wilderness planets and modern pioneering.
 
Connect with me (A.D. Everard) at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

Backhoe Lesson 101 - Just Do It.

 

Out there in the wilderness on my very first day alone, I had envisioned a day of writing, only there was a backhoe to master, a hill to work out and a road to put in - I thought I had better start early.

 

With the driveway Greg had already put in at my back, I had three options off the hill. Right, left or straight ahead. On closer inspection, it became clear that I only really had one option. The right side of the hill dipped away far too steeply to consider, dropping into a gully that a person might climb but not walk. To the left was a little better, except for when the rocks formed a cliff drop closer to the bottom. So, straight ahead it was, steep as it was, or give up entirely and find another way into the block.

 

I wanted to keep the trees, also, so needed to find a suitable way through them that wouldn’t take me over the edge of something and leave in a crumpled wreckage at the bottom of the hill. It was morning still and the sun was barely up. Greg wouldn’t be home again until after dark, and I didn’t want to spend the day trapped in wreckage.

 

First off, though, I had to learn those controls. What did what? For starters, the pedal was a three-pronged monstrosity - each prong doing something different as it titled the main pedal in a different direction, and of course it had different levers, which raised and extended the arm into different configurations, raised and tilted the bucket at the front or the scoop at the back, and lowered or raised the feet that helped steady the machine through certain operations. All of these jolted the machine alarmingly if employed too roughly. It needed a gentle touch.

 

With that sorted and a plan of action in mind, I lowered the bucket, aimed between two trees and started off over the brow of the hill.

 

*

 

My adventures living in the wilderness without a house or amenities, where the sci-fi Khekarian series was born and gave me a love of wilderness planets and modern pioneering.

 

Connect with me (A.D. Everard) at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

SO SHE WOULD DIE NOW? - from the Khekarian Threat, out now on Amazon.
 
So she would die now, and for what, for not cooperating? Words of protest tumbled into her mind, but none of them made it past her tongue. It was all too quick.
 
*
 
Aleisha meeting Sturn’s dark side. Excerpt from The Khekarian Threat, Book One in the Khekarian series.
 
First 4 chapters FREE for You to read at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

SO SHE WOULD DIE NOW? - from the Khekarian Threat, out now on Amazon.

 

So she would die now, and for what, for not cooperating? Words of protest tumbled into her mind, but none of them made it past her tongue. It was all too quick.

 

*

 

Aleisha meeting Sturn’s dark side. Excerpt from The Khekarian Threat, Book One in the Khekarian series.

 

First 4 chapters FREE for You to read at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

Adventures Just Beginning - True Life Wilderness Living.
 
So, the backhoe that neither of us could drive sat there waiting, and Greg had the key, which was the place to start - He sat in the cab and started the engine, then basically fiddled about until he knew what most of the things did, or at least how to move it forwards and backwards.
 
The caravan was on the road, too, and had been there through the night. We picked the spot for our driveway and Greg practiced with the backhoe by filling in the sudden drop from hill to roadside, and generally smoothing down a pathway. It was still very steep but was the only way onto the block.
 
When all was as good as it could be, Greg towed the caravan off the road and up to the brow of the hill where it would remain for some months before we ventured deeper. Our first mission a success, we then encountered the first snag. Greg couldn’t turn the engine off again. The key didn’t do it.
 
After half an hour searching for a switch or a lever that would turn the beast off, Greg gave up and asked me to give it a go. I did pretty much what he did, I searched everywhere, but finally spotted a bit of metal sticking out that had a screw thread, but nothing on it. Wondering if a button was missing on the thing, I played with it. It turned out to be the decompression lever and the engine, thankfully, died.
 
Great. So now we had Greg with a basic understanding of how to operate the backhoe, and me knowing how to turn it off. The next day was Monday and Greg went to work, leaving me alone to “tend the property”. That involved putting a road in, he informed me, jokingly, before heading away for the day. He had done the driveway bit, maybe a hundred feet, so it was my turn to learn and operate the heavy machine.
 
I don’t think he was expecting much, and I know I could have left it, but I thought I might just give it a go and surprise him. I was the one in for some surprises, however. If we thought the driveway was steep, I was about to learn that the other side of the hill was even steeper and dropped down far lower than the road.
 
*
 
My adventures living in the wilderness without a house or amenities, where the Khekarian series was born and gave me a love of wilderness planets and modern pioneering.
 
Connect with me (A.D. Everard) at http://bloodstonescifi.com/

Adventures Just Beginning - True Life Wilderness Living.

 

So, the backhoe that neither of us could drive sat there waiting, and Greg had the key, which was the place to start - He sat in the cab and started the engine, then basically fiddled about until he knew what most of the things did, or at least how to move it forwards and backwards.

 

The caravan was on the road, too, and had been there through the night. We picked the spot for our driveway and Greg practiced with the backhoe by filling in the sudden drop from hill to roadside, and generally smoothing down a pathway. It was still very steep but was the only way onto the block.

 

When all was as good as it could be, Greg towed the caravan off the road and up to the brow of the hill where it would remain for some months before we ventured deeper. Our first mission a success, we then encountered the first snag. Greg couldn’t turn the engine off again. The key didn’t do it.

 

After half an hour searching for a switch or a lever that would turn the beast off, Greg gave up and asked me to give it a go. I did pretty much what he did, I searched everywhere, but finally spotted a bit of metal sticking out that had a screw thread, but nothing on it. Wondering if a button was missing on the thing, I played with it. It turned out to be the decompression lever and the engine, thankfully, died.

 

Great. So now we had Greg with a basic understanding of how to operate the backhoe, and me knowing how to turn it off. The next day was Monday and Greg went to work, leaving me alone to “tend the property”. That involved putting a road in, he informed me, jokingly, before heading away for the day. He had done the driveway bit, maybe a hundred feet, so it was my turn to learn and operate the heavy machine.

 

I don’t think he was expecting much, and I know I could have left it, but I thought I might just give it a go and surprise him. I was the one in for some surprises, however. If we thought the driveway was steep, I was about to learn that the other side of the hill was even steeper and dropped down far lower than the road.

 

*

 

My adventures living in the wilderness without a house or amenities, where the Khekarian series was born and gave me a love of wilderness planets and modern pioneering.

 

Connect with me (A.D. Everard) at http://bloodstonescifi.com/